The Man from Planet X

∗∗∗∗∗∗∗∗∗∗ 

(6/10) In a nutshell: Director Edgar G. Ulmer turns this low-budget movie about an alien visitor to a small village into a visually atmospheric, retro-tinged, intelligent expressionist moral tale. Hollywood brings the first alien invasion film to the big screen with a borrowed castle set and lots of mist and obvious matte paintings. Good acting from sci-fi stalwarts Robert Clarke and William Schallert, but unfortunately the low budget, six-day shooting schedule, a mediocre script and expositional dialogue hamper the end product.

The Man from Planet X (1951). Directed by Edgar G. Ulmer, Written by Audrey Wisberg and Jack Pollexfen. Starring: Robert Clarke, Margaret Field, Raymond Bond, William Schallert, Roy Engel, Pat Goldin, Tom Daly, Harold Gould. Produced by Audrey Wisberg and Jack Pollexfen for Mid Century Films. Tomatometer: 100 %. IMDb score: 5.7

Margaret Field and Pat Goldin meet up by the space pod.

Margaret Field and Pat Goldin meet up by the space pod.

The Man from Planet X is to 1951 what Rocketship X-M (review) was to 1950 – the low-budget quickie that beat the big budget innovators to the finish line. In 1950 George Pal’s costly space adventure Destination Moon (review) was supposed to be the first serious American space film, but Kurt Neumann took advantage of the film’s lengthy production period and massive marketing, and slapped together the surprisingly good Rocketship X-M in 18 days and beat the bigger brother to cinemas by a month. At the end of 1950 The Day the Earth Stood Still (review) was in pre-production, and the producers of The Thing from Another World were all ready to start filming, but were waiting for the much needed snow to fall. Sensing that alien invasions were going to be all the rage in 1951, the producer/writer duo of Jack Pollexfen and Audrey Wisberg quickly cobbled together the production company Mid Century Productions, whipped up a script and hired cult director Edgar G. Ulmer, who shot The Man from Planet X in six days, which was released in late April 1951, a month before The Thing from Another World and nearly half a year prior to The Day the Earth Stood Still. Continue reading

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