The Phantom from 10,000 Leagues

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One of the last entries in the ever-declining line of sea monsters of the mid-fifties, this super-low-budget film was released by ARC as a B-bill to Roger Corman’s Day the World Ended. An incompetent spy whodunnit meets a ridiculously bad nuclear monster hunt. One of the worst scripts of the fifties, but the acting is surprisingly good. Stars later exploitation staple Kent Taylor.

The Phantom from 10,000 Leagues!

The Phantom from 10,000 Leagues!

The Phantom from 10,000 Leagues (1955, USA). Directed by Dan Milner. Written by Lou Rusoff. Starring: Kent Taylor, Cathy Downs, Michael Whalen, Helene Stanton, Phillip Pine, Rodney Bell, Vivi Janiss. Produced by Jack & Dan Milner for Milner Brothers Productions.
IMDb rating: 3.4/10. Tomatometer: N/A. Metascore: N/A. 

Poster.

Poster.

You may or may not remember that I recently gave 2/10 stars to Roger Corman’s post-apocalyptic snooze-fest Day the World Ended (1955, review). Well, that was American Releasing Company’s (ARC) top-billed film on a double feature that also included The Phantom from 10,000 Leagues. To be perfectly honest, I would like to give this film a 0/10 rating, just to clearly mark the distance in quality from Corman’s movie, that was at least competently filmed. But unfortunately The Phantom from 10,000 Leagues has a so-bad-it’s-good charm about it, that makes it impossible for me to give it a zero. This, by the way, was a quality that Day the World Ended sorely lacked in its grave melodrama. Continue reading

Target Earth

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(5/10) Based on a short story by Paul Fairman, Target Earth is one of the first empty world movies of the fifties. Best remembered for its clunky robot and its opening shots of an empty city, the film stumbles on bad dialogue and a low budget. Good actors like Richard Denning and Kathleen Crowley give the film gravitas, but ultimately the film’s ingredients are too thin to elevate it above B movie status.

Target Earth (1954, USA). Directed by Sherman A. Rose. Written by William Raynor, James H. Nicholson, Wyatt Ordung. Based on the story Deadly City by Paul W. Fairman. Starring Richard Denning, Kathleen Crowley, Virginia Grey, Richard Reeves, Robert Roark, Arthur Space, Whit Bissell, Steve Calvert. Produced by Sherman Cohen for Abtcon Pictures and Herman Cohen Productions. IMDB rating: 5.7/10. Tomatometer: N/A. Metascore: N/A.

Kathleen Crowley and Richard Denning fighting the invader robot.

Kathleen Crowley and Richard Denning fighting the invader robot.

1954 was a year in sci-fi that gave us some of the great classics, like Creature from the Black Lagoon (review) and Them! (review), but also movies infamous for their cheap camp, like Killers from Space (review) and Devil Girl from Mars (review). But then there are also the pictures that, justly or unjustly, are more or less forgotten today by most except us aficionados, because they were neither good nor bad enough to become either classics nor cult films. One of those is Target Earth, an independently produced cheapo that one wishes would have had a little more time, a little more budget and a little better screenwriters. In a way it is a film that you would like to like a little more than you actually do, because there is an unfulfilled potential in the movie. Continue reading

Monster from the Ocean Floor

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(4/10) This 1954 shoestring-shocker is the first ever film produced by the king of B movies, Roger Corman. Despite a non-existing budget, Corman and director Wyatt Ordung are able to cobble together a film that looks like it was produced by decent Poverty Row studio. Lead actress Anne Kimbell’s warm and sympathetic portrayal of a tourist hunting a mutated sea monster in a Mexican cove does much to raise the film above its meagre production values. A surprisingly entertaining film that is perfect for a few laughs and a bowl of popcorn.

Monster from the Ocean Floor (1954, USA). Directed by Wyatt Ordung. Written by Bill Danch. Starring: Anne Kimbell, Stuart Wade, Dick Pinner, Wyatt Ordung, Inez Palange, Jonathan Haze, David Garcia, Roger Corman.. Produced by Roger Corman for Palo Alto Productions. IMDb rating: 3.3/10. Rotten Tomatoes: N/A. Metacritic: N/A.

Anne Kimbell exhausted after having encountered the monster from the ocean floor.

Anne Kimbell exhausted after having encountered the monster from the ocean floor.

This blog has chronicled the history of science fiction cinema from its humble beginnings with Georges Méliès’ groundbreaking extravaganza A Trip to the Moon (review) in 1902 through the pioneering work of masters like Fritz Lang (Metropolis 1927 review, Woman in the Moon, 1929, review) and the creators of the Universal monsters to the fifties. Beginning with George Pal’s ambitious Destination Moon (1950, review), the early fifties marked the beginning of nearly every subgenre now found in science fiction movies of today, whether it was the alien invasion (The Day the Earth Stood Still, 1951, review), the alien monster (The Thing from Another World, 1951, review), the post-apocalyptic world (Five, 1951, review), the colonisation of space (When Worlds Collide, 1952, review) alien duplicates (Invaders from Mars, 1953, review), the futuristic war (The War of the Worlds, 1953, review) or the atomic monster (The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, 1953, review). Continue reading